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Our background began in stucco. It runs in our blood. Our family began doing stucco in Las Vegas in 1959. While most of our years have been on the commercial end, we began our current business model in 1992. Today, we perform stucco repairs on ANY texture, because we are THAT good. We perform stucco repairs, new stucco, and we work with all kinds of synthetic stuccos. We are One Coat Certified by Omega, which is required by the Building Department to perform One Coat Stucco.
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While there are many areas of North America where stucco always has a robust presence, there seems to be a general renewed interest in portland cement plaster for building surfaces everywhere. We are often asked if stucco and plaster are the same thing, and if plaster and exterior insulation finishing systems (EIFS) are the same thing.>>>article source<<<

Applying stuccoThe answer requires a fully detailed explanation. Plaster is the general term for material that is applied to a wall surface in a thin layer. Portland cement-based plaster is such a material that uses portland cement as the binder. It is sometimes called “traditional stucco.” Stucco is a somewhat informal term for portland cement plaster, and some people consider it to refer to an exterior, not interior, finish. Exterior insulation and finish system is sometimes, and incorrectly, called “synthetic” stucco. To complicate matters, “plastering” is the verb that describes the action of applying any of these various materials to a wall surface.

Portland cement plaster is applied either by hand or machine to exterior and interior wall surfaces in two or three coats. It may be applied directly to a solid base such as masonry or concrete walls, or it can be applied to metal lath attached to frame construction, solid masonry, or concrete construction. Applied directly to concrete masonry, portland cement plaster delivers a tough ½-inch thick facing that is integrally fused to the masonry substrate. When applied to metal lath, three coats of plaster form a 7/8-inch total depth. A vapor permeable, water-resistant building paper separates the plaster and lath from water-sensitive casing or framing. Portland cement plaster has high impact resistance and sheds water, but breathes, allowing water vapor to outflow. It’s a proven system that works in all climates.

While the service life of stucco can’t be quantified as a specific number of years, properly applied and maintained portland cement plaster, or stucco, is as durable as any commonly used cladding material. Its hard surface resists abrasion and can take a lot of physical abuse. It stands up to all sorts of climates, from cold to hot and wet to dry. Many homes built in the early 1900s have had very little maintenance and remain in good shape today.

Exterior insulation finishing systems (EIFS) consist of a polymer-based laminate that is wet applied, usually in two coats, to rigid insulation board that is fastened to the wall with adhesive, mechanical fasteners, or both. Polymer based (PB) systems, sometimes known as thin coat, soft coat, or flexible finishes, are the most common. The basecoat for polymer based systems is usually 1/16-inch thick and finish coat thickness is typically no thicker than the maximum sand particle size in the finish coat.

Exterior insulation finishing systems experienced performance problems in the 1990s, including water leakage and low impact resistance. While the polymer based skin repels water very effectively, problems arise when moisture gets behind the skin—typically via window, door, or other penetrations—and is trapped inside the wall. Trapped moisture eventually rots insulation, sheathing, and wood framing. It also corrodes metal framing and metal attachments. There have been fewer problems with EIFS used over solid bases such as concrete or masonry because these substrates are very stable and are not subject to rot or corrosion.

Clearly, portland cement plaster should not be confused with the exterior insulation and finish systems. The systems may share similarities in application techniques or final appearance, but the systems perform differently in resisting weather, especially wet conditions.

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